Hearing Voices Doesn’t Make You “Crazy.”

One Documentary Explores a Different Perspective.

Let’s take another perspective.

Is the traditional psychiatric view the only way to understand voice-hearing experiences? Or could there be more?

Advocacy Unlimited, a state-funded, peer-run organization in Connecticut is doing their part to make alternative views of hearing voices more accessible. On a chilly night, December 18th, CT’s Hearing Voices Network Coordinator, Skye Collins, presented a free public screening for the film, Beyond Possible: How the Hearing Voices Approach Transforms Lives at the Transformation Training Center in Milford, CT.

Their stories make them stronger.

As long as people have a place to talk about their voices — a way to frame them — then it doesn’t matter which framework is taken.

Cindy Marty Hadge was one of the panelists at the screening event as well as one of the individuals in the documentary. Cindy has made a living traveling the country, training facilitators and teaching a new way of understanding unusual experiences, like hearing voices and seeing visions.

It’s not against Psychiatry-it’s for informed consent.

Most people diagnosed with mental health diagnoses have never committed a serious act of violence and are, in fact, are more likely to have been the victims of violence themselves.

Beyond Possible is a short film, less than a half an hour in duration, but through watching the real life stories of individuals with lived experience of recovery, it drives home the point that there is more than one way for voice-hearers to relate to their experiences. While the traditional psychiatric establishment may hold a monopoly over our cultural narrative, it’s not the only path to understanding what voice-hearers deal with.

Hearing Voices Network takes no position on medications or pharmaceutical interventions — it’s always up to the individual.

While some people may think coercive treatment is necessary, it’s important to note that most people diagnosed with mental health diagnoses have never committed a serious act of violence and are, in fact, are more likely to have been the victims of violence themselves.

You don’t really know stigma… until you do.

Voice-hearing is among the most stigmatized human experiences yet it’s, statistically, as common as being left-handed. About one in ten people have heard, do hear or will have some sort of voice-hearing experience at some point in their lives — One of the most common is hearing the voice of a deceased loved one shortly after passing.

Embracing the two virtues: openness and curiosity.

two people extending their arms and holding hands.
two people extending their arms and holding hands.
Photo by Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

Rather than judge or become afraid, we can learn to say: ‘Please tell me more’.

As someone with her own lived experience, I would love for these sort of films and discussions to be allowed in more clinical settings. Since Hearing Voices takes no position on pharmaceutical interventions, this model can be used alongside the traditional one, as many people have taken this adjunct approach as well.

I’m a Peer Support Counselor/ Mental Health Content Writer

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